Category: ACA Advisor

On the evening of October 12, 2017, President Trump announced that subsidies for low income Americans in relation to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) would be stopped.
The order directs various federal agencies to explore options relating to association health plans, short term limited-duration coverage, and health reimbursement arrangements, within the next 60 to 120 days.
Reporting is required by employers with 50 or more full-time (or full-time equivalent) employees, insurers, or sponsors of self-funded health plans, on health coverage that is offered.
On June 22, 2017, the U.S. Senate released a “Discussion Draft” of the “Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017” (BCRA), aimed at "repealing and replacing" the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA).
The Department of Labor is requesting comment on a draft model form to request information regarding nonquantitative treatment limitations.
A Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC) is four page (double-sided) communication required by the federal government. It must contain specific information, in a specific order, and with a minimum size type, about a group health benefit's coverage and limitations.
On February 17, 2017, the Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a proposed rule to stabilize the health insurance market and address risks to the individual and small group markets.
On January 20, 2017, the IRS released a Memorandum on the tax treatment of benefits paid by fixed indemnity health plans that addresses two questions.
On Friday, January 20, 2017, President Trump signed his first Executive Order, titled "Minimizing the Economic Burden of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Pending Repeal."
Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), individuals are required to have health insurance while applicable large employers (ALEs) are required to offer health benefits to their full-time employees.